AYRSHIRE ROOTS

 

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Search of THE SCOTCH-IRISH OR THE SCOT IN NORTH BRITAIN, NORTH IRELAND, AND NORTH AMERICA

Source Information: Hanna, Charles A. The Scotch-Irish: The Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America Vol.1 New York, NY: G. P. Putnam, 1902.

[Boyd]  [Bruce]  [Eglinton]  [Glencairn]  [Kennedy]

PREFACE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface
Chapter I The Scotch-Irish and the Revolution
Chapter II The Scotch-Irish and the Constitution
Chapter III The Scotch-Irish in American Politics
Chapter IV New England Not The Birthplace of American Liberty
Chapter V Liberty of Speech and Conscience Definitely Established in America By Men of Scottish Blood
Chapter VI The American People Not Racially Identical With Those of New England
Chapter VII American Ideals More Scottish Than English
Chapter VIII The Scottish Kirk and Human Liberty
Chapter IX Religion in Early Scotland and Early England
Chapter X Scottish Achievement
Chapter XI The Tudor-stuart Church Responsible For Early American Animosity to England
Chapter XII Who Are The Scotch-Irish?
Chapter XIII Scotland of To-day
Chapter XIV The Caledonians, Or Picts
Chapter XV The Scots and Picts
Chapter XVI The Britons
Chapter XVII The Norse and Galloway
Chapter XVIII The Angles
Chapter XIX Scottish History in The English Or Anglosaxon Chronicle
Chapter XX From Malcolm Canmore to King David
Chapter XXI William The Lion
Chapter XXII The Second and Third Alexanders to John Baliol
Chapter XXIII Wallace and Bruce
Chapter XXIV John of Fordun's Annals of Wallace And brucexcviiirise and First Start of William Wallace
Chapter XXV From Bruce to Flodden
Chapter XXVI The Beginning of The Reformation
Chapter XXVII The Days of Knox
Chapter XXVIII James Stuart, Son of Mary
Chapter XXIX The Wisest Fool in Christendom
Chapter XXX Scotland Under Charles I
Chapter XXXI Scotland Under Charles II and The Bishops
Chapter XXXII Ireland Under The Tudors
Chapter XXXIII The Scottish Plantation of Down and Antrim
Chapter XXXIV The Great Plantation of Ulster
Chapter XXXV The Ulster Plantation From 1610 to 1630
Chapter XXXVI Stewart's and Brereton's Accounts of The Plantation of Ulster
Chapter XXXVII Church Rule in Ireland and Its Results
Chapter XXXVIII Londonderry and Enniskillen
Chapter XXXIX The Emigration. From Ulster to America

 

Eglinton 

 

THE DAYS OF KNOX



Some weeks before the marriage, a league to punish Bothwell for his crimes had been formed by some of the nobles, among whom were Kirkaldy of Grange, Lethington, Morton, Mar, Ruthyen, Lindsay, Hume, Herries, Glencairn, Cassilis, and Some weeks before the marriage, a league to punish Bothwell for his crimes had been formed by some of the nobles, among whom were Kirkaldy of Grange, Lethington, Morton, Mar, Ruthyen, Lindsay, Hume, Herries, Glencairn, Cassilis, and Eglinton. Within a few weeks after the marriage, these men were ready to execute their scheme.


THE SCOTTISH PLANTATION OF DOWN AND ANTRIM



Both
Hamilton and Montgomery, as soon as their patents were passed by the Irish Council, crossed into Scotland to call upon their whole kith and kin to aid them in the plantation of their vast estates. Both were Ayrshire men, from the northern division of the county. Hamilton was of the family of Hamilton of Dunlop, while Montgomery was of the great Ayrshire family of that name, sprung from a collateral branch of the noble house of Eglinton, and sixth Laird of Braidstone, near Beith. The king had granted Con's land to Hamilton on the express condition that he should "plant" it with Scottish and English colonists. Hamilton seems to have received the hearty support of his own family, for four of his five brothers aided his enterprise and shared his prosperity. From them are descended numerous families in Ulster, and at least two Irish noble families.

 

Glencairn
 

 

THE BEGINNING OF THE REFORMATION


 
of Ayrshire,
John Douglas, Paul Methven, and others. In December, 1557, a number of the nobles came out on the side of the Reformation movement, and joined in a bond, known as the First Covenant, by which they agreed to assist each other in advancing the reformation of religion, in "maintaining God's true congregation, and renouncing the congregation of Satan." Among those who subscribed this document were Archibald Campbell, Earl of Argyle, and his son Archibald (Lord Lorne), Alexander Cunningham, Earl of Glencairn, James Douglas, Earl of Morton, and John Erskine of Dun. The leaders of this movement came to be known as "the Lords of the Congregation."Earl of Glencairn, standing before the congregation, said, "Let every man serve his conscience. I will, by God's grace, see my brethren in St. Johnstown [Perth]; yea, although never man should accompany me, I will go, if it were but with a pike on my shoulder; for I had rather die with that company than live after them." These brave words so stirred his hearers that they immediately set forth for Perth. Twelve hundred mounted men and as many more on foot was the number that reached there. With them were Glencairn, Lords Ochiltree and Boyd, and brave James Chalmers of Gadgirth--the same who had forbidden the queen regent to harm the preachers.
 


THE DAYS OF KNOX



Moray and his associates--
the Duke of Chatelherault, the Earls of Argyle, Glencairn, Rothes, and other barons--having mustered a thousand of their followers, were proclaimed rebels. They were unable to face the royal forces, and retired to Dumfries. Afterwards they disbanded and fled to England. 

After the birth of James VI., the queen became reconciled with the rebellious nobles, and though
Huntly (the fifth earl) and Bothwell remained at the head of the government, Moray, Argyle, Glencairn, and others were readmitted to a share in its administration. In December, the baptism of the infant prince took place at Stirling. All the preparations for the ceremony were committed to Bothwell. Darnley was not present at the baptism. He was in Stirling during the festivities, but kept his own apartment. 

Some weeks before the marriage, a league to punish
Bothwell for his crimes had been formed by some of the nobles, among whom were Kirkaldy of Grange, Lethington, Morton, Mar, Ruthyen, Lindsay, Hume, Herries, Glencairn, Cassilis, and Eglinton. Within a few weeks after the marriage, these men were ready to execute their scheme.
 

Boyd


WHO ARE THE SCOTCH-IRISH?



The two counties which have been most thoroughly transformed by this emigration are the two which are nearest Scotland, and were the first opened up for emigrants. These two have been completely altered in nationality and religion. They have become British, and in the main, certainly Scottish. Perhaps no better proof can be given than the family names of the inhabitants. Some years ago, a patient local antiquary took the voters' list of county Down "of those rated above 12 for poor-rates," and analyzed it carefully. There were 10,028 names on the list, and these fairly represented the whole proper names of the county. He found that the following names occurred oftenest, and arranged them in order of their frequency:
Smith, Martin, M'Kie, Moore, Brown, Thompson, Patterson, Johnson, Stewart, Wilson, Graham, Campbell, Robinson, Bell, Hamilton, Morrow, Gibson, Boyd, Wallace, and Magee. He dissected as carefully the voters' list for county Antrim, in which there were 9538 names, and found that the following were at the top: Thompson, Wilson, Stewart, Smith, Moore, Boyd, Johnson, M'Millan, Brown, Bell, Campbell, M'Neill, Crawford, M'Alister, Hunter, Macaulay, Robinson, Wallace, Millar, Kennedy, and Hill. The list has a very Scottish flavor altogether, although it may be noted that the names that are highest on the list are those which are common to both England and Scotland: for it may be taken for granted that the English "Thompson" has swallowed up the Scottish "Thomson," that "Moore" includes the Ayrshire "Muir," and that the Annandale "Johnstones" have been merged by the writer in the English "Johnsons." One other point is very striking--that the great Ulster name of O'Neill is wanting, and also the Antrim "Macdonnel." . . . Another strong proof of the Scottish blood of the Ulstermen may be found by taking the annual reports presented to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland, held in June, 1887. Here are the names of the men, lay and clerical, who sign these reports, the names being taken as they occur: J. W. Whigham, Jackson Smith, Hamilton Magee, Thomas Armstrong, William Park, J. M. Rodgers, David Wilson, George Macfarland, Thomas Lyle, W. Rogers, J. B. Wylie, W. Young, E. F. Simpson, Alexander Turnbull, John Malcolm, John H. Orr. Probably the reports of our three Scottish churches taken together could not produce so large an average of Scottish surnames.-- The Scot in Ulster, Edinburgh, 1888, pp. 103-105.
 


JOHN OF FORDUN'S ANNALS OF WALLACE AND BRUCE RISE AND FIRST START OF WILLIAM WALLACE



"They were,
William of Lambyrton, Bishop of St Andrew's; Robert Wisheart, Bishop of Glasgow; the Abbot of Scone; the four brothers of Bruce, Edward, Nigel, Thomas, and Alexander; his nephew, Thomas Randolph of Strathdon; his brother-in-law, Christopher Seaton of Seaton; Malcolm (5th) Earl of Lennox; John of Strathbogie (l0th) Earl of Athole; Sir James Douglas; Gilbert de la Haye of Errol, and his brother Hugh de la Haye; David Barclay of Cairns of Fife; Alexander Fraser, brother of Simon Fraser of Oliver Castle; Walter de Somerville of Linton and Carnwath; David of Inchmartin; Robert Boyd; and Robert Fleming; Randolph, afterwards Earl of Moray; Seaton, ancestor of the Duke of Gordon, Earl of Winton, Earl of Dunfermline, and Viscount Kingston; De la Haye, of Earl of Errol; Fraser of Lord Lovat and Lord Salton; Somerville, of Lord Somerville; Inchmartin, of Earl of Findlater, Earl of Airley, and Lord Banff; Boyd, of Earl of Kilmarnock; Fleming of Earl of Wigton. Matth. Westm., p. 452, adds Alan Earl of Mentieth. Nigel Campbell, the predecessor of the Duke of Argyle, etc., and Fraser of Oliver Castle, were also engaged in the cause; but it does not appear that they assisted at the coronation of Robert I.--To this list David Moray, Bishop of Moray, might be added. The English asserted that he preached to the people of his diocese, ' that it was no less meritorious to rise in arms for supporting the cause of Bruce, than to engage in a crusade against the Saracens.' "--Hailes, Annals of Scotland, vol ii., pp. 2, 3.
 


FROM BRUCE TO FLODDEN



He was succeeded by his son,
James III., also a boy of eight years at the time of his father's death. For several years the government was conducted by Bishop Kennedy, who died in 1466. Lord Boyd then seized the king's person, and assumed supreme control of the kingdom. In 1467, his eldest son was created Earl of Arran and married to the king's sister. But the rule of the Boyds was of short duration. In 1469 they were tried for treason and convicted. The head of the house fled to England, where he soon afterwards died. His brother Alexander was executed at Edinburgh. The Earl of Arran was forced to flee, and was soon stripped of his royal wife by a divorce. She afterwards married the head of the Hamilton family, and that house subsequently attained a high position in the kingdom.
 


THE BEGINNING OF THE REFORMATION



if it were but with a pike on my shoulder; for I had rather die with that company than live after them." These brave words so stirred his hearers that they immediately set forth for Perth. Twelve hundred mounted men and as many more on foot was the number that reached there. With them were
Glencairn, Lords Ochiltree and Boyd, and brave James Chalmers of Gadgirth--the same who had forbidden the queen regent to harm the preachers.
 


JAMES STUART, SON OF MARY



In the spring of 1581, the king ratified Craig's Confession of Faith, which thus became the first National Covenant of Scotland. About this time
Boyd, Archbishop of Glasgow, having died, the Privy Council granted to the Duke of Lennox the revenues of the archbishopric. But as Lennox was not able to draw them in his own name, he had recourse to a bishop of straw, according to the tulchan system. He found a minister of Stirling, named Robert Montgomery, who consented to play the part of his tulchan; and the king sought to impose this puppet upon the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.
 


THE SCOTTISH PLANTATION OF DOWN AND ANTRIM



John Adair, Thomas Aiken, Widow Alexander, William Alexander, Robert Allan, Andrew Anderson, James Anderson, James Anderson's widow, Robert Anderson, James Aniston, William Armstrong, David Aul, James Aule, Alexander Baillie, Alexander Baily, Edward Baily, James Bailie, John Baily, Esq., William Barclay, James Beatty,--- Beatty's executors, William Beers, James Biglam, James Black, James Blackwood, John Blackwood, John Bleakly, Sr., James Blakely, John Blakely, Jr., James Blany, David Boid, Widow Boid, William Bole, David Boyd, John Bredfoot, Thomas Bradin, Thomas Bradly, Gilbert Brakenrig, Thomas Bradley, Alexander Browne, George Browne, James Browne, Widow Browne, Samuel Browne, William Brown, George Byers, James Byers, Widow Byers, William Byers, John Camlin, John Campbell, Michael Campbell, Robert Campbell, Widow Campbell, James Carmuheall (Carmichael?), M. Carr, Henry Carse, James Caul, James Chambers, Andrew Clarke, James Clarke, John Cleland, Patrick Cleland, Widow Cleland, John Clugston, Widow Cochran, Richard Coney, Thomas Cooper, Widow Cooper, John Corey, Joseph Corsby, Thomas Costbes, Thomas Coulter, A. Cowden, William Cow-den, Widow Cowey, William Crafford, James Cringle, Hugh Criswill, James Criswill, St., William Criswell, Robert Cudbert, John Cumin, Robert Cunningham, Widow Danison, John Davison, John Daziell, John Delop, Andrew Dixon, Jalnes Dixon, John Doblin, Alexander Dobby, William Donnelson, Widow Dowy, David Duffe, David Duggan, Widow Duggan, James Dunlap, John Dunlap, George Dunn, John Espy, John Fairiss, Captain Fairly, Hugh Fairly, William Fairly, Alexander Ferguson, Hugh Ferguson, Thomas Ferguson, Andrew Finlay, Hans Finlay, John Finlay, Robert Finlay, Nathaniel Forgy, George Forman, George Forrest, James Forrest, Nathaniel Forsythe, William Fullerton, John Gamble, William Gastle, John Gay, Hugh Gervin, Alexander Gibony, John Gibbon, Widow Gibson, WilIiam Gibson, John Gilmore, John Gilpatrick, James Gordon, John Gowdy, schoolmaster, William Gowdy, Widow Greer, Widow Gregg, Hugh Hamil, Esq., Alexander Hamilton, Archibald Hamilton, Arthur Hamilton, Captain Gawen Hamilton, Lieut. Gawin Hamilton, Hugh Hamilton, James Hamilton, John Hamilton, Patrick Hamilton, Robert Hamilton, Robert Hamilton, tailor, Robert Hamilton, merchant, Widow Hamilton, William Hamilton, William Hamilton, Esq., Thomas Hamington, Patrick Hannah, Lodk. Harper, John Harris, Widow Hawthorne, John Hay, John Henderson, John Henry, James Heron, Widow Heron, David Heslip, John Francis Hewart, James Hewitt, William Hewitt, William Hillhouse, William Hogg, ---- Holhouse, John Hollan, David Holland, William Holliday, William Hollyday,---How, Gilbert How, John Hui, John Hunter, Alexander Hutchison, Henry Inch, John Ireland, James Irwin, John Irwin, St., Robert Irwin, John Jackson, John Jenkin, George Johnston, John Johnston, William Johnson, 

In the Montgomery Manuscripts is preserved a careful account of how
Hugh Montgomery "planted" his estate, the country around Newtown and Donaghadee, known as the "Great Ards." Montgomery belonged to a family having numerous connections throughout North Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, and to them he turned for assistance. His principal supporters were his kinsman, Thomas Montgomery, who had done the successful wooing at Carrickfergus; his brother-in-law, John Shaw, younger son of the Laird of Wester Greenock; and Colonel David Boyd, of the noble house of Kilmarnock. With their help, Montgomery seems to have persuaded many others of high and low degree to try their fortunes with him in Ireland. BalIyblack and Ballykeel, and were the progenitors of a very numerous connection of this surname throughout the Ards. The earliest recorded deaths in this connection, after their settlement in the Ards, were those of James Orr of Ballyblack, who died in the year 1627, and Janet McClement, his wife, who died in 1636

The descendants, male and female, of this worthy couple were very numerous, and as their intermarriages have been carefully recorded, we have thus fortunately a sort of index to the names of many other families of Scottish settlers in the Ards and Castlereagh. Their descendants in the male line intermarried with the families of Dunlop, Gray, Kennedy, Coulter, Todd, M'Birney, M'Cullough, Campbell, Dunlop, Gray, Kennedy, Coulter, Todd, M'Birney, M'Cullough, Campbell, Boyd, Jackson, Walker, Rodgers, Stevenson, Malcomson, King, Ferguson, M'Quoid, Cregg, Bart, M'Munn, Bryson, Johnson, Smith, Carson, M'Kinstry, Busby, M'Kce, Shannon, M'Garock, Hamilton, Cally, Chalmers, Red, M'Roberts, Creighton, M'Whirter, M'Kibben, Cleland, Abernethy, Reid, Agnew, Wilson, Irvine, Lindsay, M'Creary, Porter, Hanna, Taylor, Smyth, Carson, Wallace, Gamble, Miller, Catherwood, Malcolm, M'Cleary, Pollok, Lamont, Frame, Stewart, Minnis, Moorehead, M'Caw, Clark, Patterson, Neilson, Maxwell, Harris, Corbet, Milling, Carr, Winter, Patty, Cumming, M'Connell, M'Gowan 

Ballyblack, Clontinacally, Killinether, Ballygowan, Ballykeel, MunIough, Bally-been, Castleaverie, Conlig, Lisleen, Bangor, Gortgrib, Granshaw, Killaghey, Gilna-hirk, Ballyalloly, Ballyknockan, Ballycloughan, Tullyhubbert, Moneyrea, Newtownards, Ballymisca, Dundonald, Magherascouse, Castlereagh, Bootin, Lisdoonan, Greyabbey, Ballyrea, Ballyhay, Ballywilliam, Saintfield, Ballymacarrett, Craigantlet, Braniel. The greatest number of the name lived in Ballykeel, Clontinacally, and Ballygowan.  

The descendants in the female line from James Orr and Janet M'Clement of Ballyblack inter-married with the families of Riddle of Comber, Thomson of Newtownards, Moore of Drum-mon, Orr of Lisleen, Orr of Ballykeel, Murdock of Comber, Irvine of Crossnacreevy, M'Creary of Bangor, Hanna of Conlig, Orr of Bangor, Orr of Ballygowan, M'Munn of Lis-leen, Barr of Lisleen, Davidson of Clontinacally, Jamieson of Killaghey, Martin of Killy-nure, Martin of Gilnahirk, Matthews of ---, Watson of Carryduff, Shaw of Clontinacally, Todd of Ballykeel, Jennings of ---, Davidson of ---, M'Kibbin of Knocknasham, M'Cormick of Ballybeen, M'Cullock of Ballyhanwood, M'Kee of Lisleen, Patterson of Moneyrea, Dunwoody of Madyroe, Barr uf Bangor, M'Gee of Todstown, Burgess of Mady-roe, M'Kinning of Lisnasharock, Gerrit of Ballyknockan, Pettigrew of Ballyknockan, M'Coughry of Ballyknockan, Yates of ---, Shaw of ---, Stevenson of Ballyrush, .M'Kib-bin of Haw, Piper of Comber, Blakely of Madyroe, Orr of Ballyknockan, Stewart of Clon-tinacally, Hamilton of Ballykeel, Dunbar of Slatady, Orr of Ballygowan, Malcolm of Bootan, Porter of Ballyristle, M'Connell of Ballyhenry, Kennedy of Comber, Malcolm of Moat, Orr of Ballykeel, Martin of Ballycloughan, Reid of Ballygowan, Lewis of ---, Orr of Clontinacally, Orr of Florida, M'Creary of ---, Miller of Conlig, Lowry of Bally-macashan, Harris of Ballymelady, Orr of BaIlyknockan, M'Quoid of Donaghadee, Appleton of Conlig, M'Burney of ---, Hanna of Clontinacally, Johnson of Rathfriland, Orr of Bally-keel, Stewart of Clontinacally and Malone, Patterson of Moneyrea and Lisbane, Black of Gortgrib, Hill of Gilnahirk, Murdock of Gortgrif, Kilpatrick of ---., Gregg of ---, Huddlestone of Moneyrea, M'Culloch of Moneyrea, Steel of Maghrescouse, Erskine of Woodlburn, Campbell of ---, White of ---, Clark of Clontinacally, M'Fadden of Clon-tinacally, Hunter of Clontinacally and Ravarra, Orr of Castlereagh, M'Kean of ---, M'Kittrick of Lisleen, Frame of Munlough, Garret of Ballyknockan, Kennedy of Tullygir-
 


THE GREAT PLANTATION OF ULSTER



James seems to have seen that the parts of Scotland nearest Ireland, and which had most intercourse with it, were most likely to yield proper colonists. He resolved, therefore, to enlist the assistance of the great families of the southwest, trusting that their feudal power would enable them to bring with them bodies of colonists. Thus grants were made to the Duke of Lennox, who bad great power in Dumbartonshire; to the Earl of Abercorn and his brothers, who represented the power of the Hamiltons in Renfrewshire. North Ayrshire had been already largely drawn on by Hamilton and Montgomery, but one of the sons of Lord Kilmarnock, Sir Thomas Boyd, received a grant; while from South Ayrshire came the Cunninghams and Crawfords, and Lord Ochiltree and his son; the latter were known in Galloway as well as in the county from which their title was derived. But it was on Galloway men that the greatest grants were bestowed. Almost all the great houses of the times are represented,--Sir Robert Maclellan, Laird Bomby as he is called, who afterwards became Lord Kirkcudbright, and whose great castle stands to this day; John Murray of Broughton, one of the secretaries of state; Vans of Barnbarroch; Sir Patrick MeKie of Laerg; Dunbar of Mochrum; one of the Stewarts of Garlies, from whom Newtown-Stewart in Tyrone takes its name. Some of these failed to implement their bargains, but the best of the undertakers proved to be men like the earl of Abercorn and his brothers, and the Stewarts of Ochiltree and Garlies; for while their straitened means led them to seek fortune in Ireland, their social position enabled them without difficulty to draw good colonists from their own districts, and so fulfil the terms of the "plantation" contract, which bound them to "plant" their holdings with tenants. With the recipient of two thousand acres, tbe agreement was that he was to bring "forty-eight able men of the age of eighteen or upwards, being born in England or the inward parts of Scotland." He was further bound to grant farms to his tenants, the sizes of these being specified, and it being particularly required that these should be "feus" or on lease for twenty-one years or for life. A stock of muskets and hand weapons to arm himself and his tenants was to be provided. The term used, "the inward parts of Scotland," refers to the old invasions of Ulster by the men of the Western Islands. No more of these Celts were wanted; there were plenty of that race already in North Antrim; it was the Lowland Scots, who were peace-loving and Protestants, whom the Government desired. The phrase, "the inward parts of Scotland," occurs again and again.
 


THE ULSTER PLANTATION FROM 1610 TO 1630



1500 acres to Sir Thomas Boyd, Knt., of Bedlay [or Bonehawe], Renfrewshire. Transferred to James Hamilton before 1620.
 
1500 acres,
James Hamilton, Earl of Abercorn (transferred from Sir Thomas Boyd): bawn and large strong castle begun; 3 freeholders, 10 lessees; able to produce 100 men with arms.
 


LONDONDERRY AND ENNISKILLEN



Major John Stewart, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Kennedy, Captain James Stewart, Captain Alexander Stewart, Fergus MacDougall, John MacDougall, John Boyle, John Getty, Alexander Stewart, sen., James Maxwell, Captain Marmaduke Shaw, John Henry, Cornet Robert Knox, Mr. William Hutchin, Robert Henry, Alexander Scott, Lieutenant James Moncrief, Robert Harrute, Andrew Rowan, Thomas Boyd, Samuel Dunbarr, Alexander Delap, Adam Delap, Anthony Kennedy, Major Hugh Montgomery, Cornet John Gordon, Captain John Huston, Lieutenant-Colonel Cunningham, John Bell, Mr. Adam Boyd, John Reid, Lieutenant Arch. Campbell, Mr. John Peoples, Mr. Cathcart, Captain Arch. Boyd, Captain John Robinson, Lieutenant Thomas Stewart, Quarter-master Robert Stewart.
 
Presbytery of Route--
David Buttle, Ballymena; William Cumming, Kilraughts?; John Douglass, Broughshane; Robert Hogsyard, Ballyrashane; Gabriel Cornwall, Ballywillan?; Thomas Fulton, Dunboe?; William Crooks,* Ballykelly; Thomas Boyd,* Aghadoey; James Ker, Ballymoney; John Law, Garvagh.
 
Oliver Apton, Adam Ardock, Thomas Ash, William Babbington, Andrew Bailly, John Bailly, Robert Bayley, Thomas Baker, James Barrington, Robert Bennet, Bartholomew Black, James Blair. Francis Boyd, Robert Boyd, Thomas Brunett, John Buchanan, John Campbell, William Campbell, Henry Campsie, James Carr, George Church, William Church, Michael Clanaghan, Matthew Clarke, Dalway Clements, John Clements, John Cochran, Matthew Cocken, Thomas Conlay, Richard Cormack, George Crofton, John Crofton, Richard, Crofton, John Cross, William Cross, David Mons Cuistion, James Cunningham, John Conningham, Michael Cunningham, Edward Curling, Henry Cust, Edward Davyes, Robert Dennison, John Dobbin, William Dobbin, Adam Downing, Philip Dunbarr, Richard Fane, Daniel Fisher, James Fleming, Richard Fleming, John Fuller, Ralph Fullerton, James Galtworth, George Garnet, James Gledstanes, Stephen Godfrey, Warren Godfrey, Joseph Gordon, James Graham, Andrew Grigson, William Grove, Thomas Gughtredge, James Hairs, Albert Hall, John Halshton, Hugh Hamill, Andrew Hamilton, Arthur Hamilton, John Hamilton (2), William Hamilton .... Hannston, John Hering, Abraham

 

Bruce

 


THE SCOTCH-IRISH AND THE REVOLUTION



First Regiment.Colonel, John H. Stone; Captains, Gaither, Roxborough, Ewing, Winder; Lieutenants, Smith, Bruce, Farnadis, Peal; commissioned officers, 19; staff, 5; non-commissioned and privates, 374.
 


SCOTTISH ACHIEVEMENT


 
Among the great thinkers in the fields of political and practical science Scotland has given to the world James Watt (the inventor of the steam-engine), Adam Smith, Hugh Miller, William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), Joseph Black, Robert Simson, John Robinson, Sir James Mackintosh, Sir Alexander Mackenzie, Morell Mackenzie, William Murdoch (the inventor of illuminat-ing-gas), John Napier (the inventor of logarithms), James Bruce, the two Rosses, Mungo Park, James Grant, Dugald Stewart, and David Livingstone, besides a legion of American scientists of the first rank. William Ewart Gladstone was of purely Scottish parentage. His father, born in Leith, was descended from a Lanarkshire farmer, and his mother, Ann Robertson, belonged to the Rossshire Robertsons. James Bryce likewise is of Scottish descent. In America, during the past ten years, these two men were the best known and most popular Britons of the decade, and Gladstone's death was mourned as generally on this side of the Atlantic as in Great Britain. Lord Rosebery, the present leader of the Liberal party in Great Britain, is also a Scotchman.
 
Gedd, the inventor of stereotyping, was a Scotchman. The Scot also gave us the lightning presses. Scott, Gordon, and Campbell are of our blood. David Bruce, the pioneer type-maker, the inventor of the type-casting machine, introduced the Gedd process in America. Archibald Binney and James Ronaldson established the first type foundry in Philadelphia. To Bruce and the McKellars we are greatly indebted for the advanced position our country holds to-day in this great industry. The first American newspaper, the News-Letter, was published in Boston by John Campbell. William Maxwell, a Scotchman, published at Cincinnati the first newspaper in the Northwest Territory; and the first religious paper in the United States was published at Chillicothe, Ohio, by a Scotchman.
 
Do we speak of war, a thousand Scotch names rise above all the heroes:
Wallace at Stirling; Bruce, at Bannockburn; Wolfe's Scottish soldiers at the Heights of Abraham; Forbes at Fort Duquesne; Stark at Bennington; Campbell at King's Mountain; Scott at Lundy s Lane; Perry on Lake Erie; Grant at Appomattox. Were not Wellington and Napier Scotch?  

Professor Hinsdale, an Ohio historian of Puritan extraction, wrote this bit of truth: "The triumph of James Wolfe and his Highlanders on the Heights of Abraham, and not the embattled farmers of Lexington, won the first victory of the American Revolution." And did it come by mere chance that another Scotchman, in the person of General John Forbes, at about the same time, led the English forces that reduced Fort Duquesne at the confluence of the three rivers, and opened the gateway to the boundless west for the forward march of Anglo-Saxon civilization? Did it come by chance that James Grant was the commander in the relief of Lucknow; that the unmatched Havelock led Scottish soldiers in his Asiatic campaigns which brought such lustre to British arms? We have a right to manifest pride in the fact that of the four field commanders-in-chief in the Civil War, three were Scotch--Scott, McClellan, and Grant. Chinese Gordon was a Scot. Through the veins of Robert E. Lee flowed the blood of Robert Bruce. Ulysses S. Grant and Jefferson Davis were descendants of the same Scotch family of Simpson.
  
James I. was anxious to place a garrison there that would be able not only to shut the door, but to keep it shut, in the face of his French or Spanish enemies; and, accordingly, when an attempt was made at the Revolution to force the door, the garrison was there--the advanced outpost of English power--to shut it in the face of the planter's grandson, and so to save the liberties of England at the most critical moment in its history. One may see (as Hugh Miller did) in the indomitable firmness of the besieged at Deror the spirit of their ancestors under Wallace and Bruce, and recognize in the gallant exploits of the Enniskillen men under Gustavus Hamilton, routing two of the forces despatched to attack them, and compelling a third to retire, a repetition of the thrice-fought and thrice-won battle of Roslin .... 

The affinity between France and America is not limited to the latter's appreciation and imitation in matters of art alone. At an early day in the history of this country, that affinity extended far beyond the bounds of aesthetical amenities. It included the fields of politics, of science, and of warfare. The reason for this is not far to seek. There are many people in America who never will, nor do they care to, understand aright the history of the building of the American nation; and to these people the idea of such a thing as a close bond of union and sympathy with France, which for so long a time obviously existed in America, is one of the things which they cannot explain, and for which they can only account by classing it as an anomaly. To honest students of their country's history, however, and to all who can see beyond their own immediate community or horizon, it is evident that there was no anomaly in a Franco-American alliance; and that to a very large proportion of the American people whose forefathers were here in pre-Revolutionary days, such a union was quite as much to be expected as, at other times, would be an alliance with England. The Ancient League between Scotland and France, which existed from before the time of
Bruce until the days of Knox, was an alliance for defence and offence against the common enemy of both; and that League was the veritable prototype of the later alliance between America and France against the same enemy.
 


SCOTLAND OF TO-DAY



In this district are to be found the chief evidences in Scotland of the birth or residence of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Dumbartonshire is the reputed birthplace of St. Patrick, Ireland's teacher and patron saint. Elderslie, in Renfrewshire, is said to have been the birthplace of Scotland's national hero, William Wallace. Robert Bruce also, son of Marjorie, Countess of Carrick and daughter of Nigel or Niall (who was himself the Celtic Earl of Carrick and grandson of Gilbert, son of Fergus, Lord of Galloway), was, according to popular belief, born at his mother's castle of Turnberry, in Ayrshire. The seat of the High Stewards of Scotland, ancestors of the royal family of the Stuarts, was in Renfrewshire. The paternal grandfather of William Ewart Gladstone was born in Lanarkshire. John Knox's father is said to have belonged to the Knox family of Renfrewshire. Robert Burns was born in Ayrshire. The sect called the "Lollards," who were the earliest Protestant reformers in Scotland, appear first in Scottish history as coming from Kyle in Ayrshire, the same district which afterwards furnished a large part of the leaders and armies of the Reformation. The Covenanters and their armies of the seventeenth century were mainly from the same part of the kingdom. Glasgow, the greatest manufacturing city of Europe, is situated in the heart of this district. 
 


THE NORSE AND GALLOWAY



"Even at so late a period as the reign of Robert Bruce, the castle of Irvine was accounted to be in Galloway. There is reason to suppose that a people of Saxon origin encroached by degrees on the ancient Galloway. The names of places in Cuningham are generally Saxon. The name of the country itself is Saxon. In Kyle there is some mixture of Saxon. All the names in Carrick are purely Gaelic."--Lord Hailes, Annals of Scotland, vol. i., p. 118.
 


FROM MALCOLM CANMORE TO KING DAVID



"State papers, properly so-called, few, but of great importance, begin in the reign of Alexander III., or the latter half of the thirteenth century, and there are still preserved imperfect records of parliamentary proceedings, from the age of Robert Bruce downwards.Robert Bruce, its people had not yet acquired, nor perhaps desired, the right of trial by jury, but practised the mode of purgation and acquittance according to their ancient laws--those very laws of the Brets and Scots which Edward in vain endeavored to abolish. As late as 1385, Archibald Douglas, lord of Galloway, while undertaking in Parliament to further the execution of justice within his territory, protested for the liberty of the law of Galloway in all points."
 
Alcluyd kingdom had been destroyed, the inhabitants -- the descendants of the Damnii--were known by the appellation of Walenses. It is therefore probable that the ancestors of Wallace adopted the patronymic of Walense, in the same way that Inglis is known to have been assumed from English, or Fleming from the Flemings. This is strongly countenanced by the fact that the name of the family was originally Walens. The coincidence is at all events curious, and not without interest. The property of Richard Walens may have been called Richardtun, in accordance with the prevailing Saxon custom of the time--not because he was himself of English extraction. The Flemings, who were all foreigners, came to be so numerous in Scotland that they were privileged to be governed by their own laws. The list of lowland clans, amounting in all to thirty-nine, if it is authentic, which is very doubtful, as given in the recently published MS. of Bishop Leslie, who wrote during the reign of Queen Mary, shows that the greater number were of Saxon or Norman extraction. The following is the list: Armstrong, Barclay, Brodie,
Bruce, Colquhoun, Comyn, Cuninghame, Cranstoun, Crawford, Douglas, Drummond, Dunbar, Dundas, Erskine, Forbes, Gordon, Graham, Hamilton, Hay, Home, Johnstone, Kerr, Lauder, Leslie, Lindsay, Maxwell, Montgomerie, Murray, Ogilvie, Oliphant, Ramsay, Rose, Ruthven, Scott, Seton, Sinclair, Urquhart, Wallace, Wemyss.
"When Stephen came he broke into the Scots' border while David's army continued pil-laging in England. But Stephen had troubles in the South to which he had to turn quickly, leaving the country to defend itself as the great host advanced southward in the direction of York. . . . The Norman barons gathered into a group, among whom we find William of Albemarle, Walter of Ghent, with De Moubrays, De Percys, De Coucys, Nevilles, and Fer-rers. Two Norman knights, with names afterwards familiar in history, were selected to reason with King David, because they held lands of him as well as of the English king. They were
Robert de Bruce and Bernard de Baliol, both men whose descendants became weI1 known in Scotland. Their mission was ineffective, and they returned to their comrades, withdrawing allegiance from King David, and leaving their Scots estates to be forfeited, if need be."--Burton, History of Scotland, vol. i., pp. 435-437.
 


WILLIAM THE LION


Such was probably the true reason why Bruce, Fitz-Alan, De Moreville, and other great Norman nobles never appear as earls, but only with the rights and custom of an earl." Holding by Scottish service they would have been powerless without a kindred "following": whilst a feudal tenure would have interfered with the proprietary rights of the very class which formed the military strength of the earldom. History clearly shows that, as the power of the sovereign extended over the west, it was his policy, not to eradicate the old ruling families, but to retain them in their native provinces, rendering them more or less responsible for all that portion of their respective districts which was not placed under the immediate authority of the royal sheriffs or baillies. In Galloway, Argyle, and Ross, the old races were thus confirmed in authority, and the result was comparative peace. In Moray the old race was proscribed; feudal tenure was purposely introduced, wherever it was possible; and the result was rebellion for a century. Elsewhere a similar policy would have unquestionably produced corresponding results. Confiscation would have been followed by rebellion, and the policy which spared the native races in the once disaffected districts of Galloway, Argyle, and Ross would have scarcely risked such an alternative amongst the loyal proprietary of Scotia. Intermarriage gradually familiarized the Scots with the feudal barons holding earldoms, and knights holding thanedoms; but I think it very doubtful if either earldom or thanedom were originally conferred upon baron or knight; or if any earldom was held by feudal tenure until Bruce gave Moray to Randolf, to be held by both knight service and Scottish service. 

"The house of
Bruce was a fine type of those Norman races in whose hands were the destinies of so many European communities. Why they should have been so loved and courted, is one of the mysteries in the histories of social influences. What they were at the Court of Edward the Confessor, they became in the courts of the Scots kings from David downwards.
 


THE SECOND AND THIRD ALEXANDERS TO JOHN BALIOL



I
n 1219, David, Earl of Huntingdon, died, leaving a son John, (who afterwards became the Earl of Chester), and three daughters: Margaret, married to Alan of Galloway; Isabella, married to Robert Bruce; and Ada, married to Henry de Hastings. The union of Isabella with Robert Bruce, gave the family of the latter its title to the crown. In 1221, King Alexander married Princess Joan of England, sister of Henry III. The following year, an insurrection having occurred in Argyle, many of the native leaders were forced to leave that district, and their estates were distributed among the king's followers. In 1228, Gillescop rose in insurrection and ravaged portions of Moray and Inverness. He was slain in 1229. Shortly before that time the Isle of Man had become subject to Alan, Lord of Galloway. 

In the year 1271, Louis, King of France, after he had won from the dis-comfited Saracens a certain very large island named Barbary, met his doom; as did his first-born son Louis, and much people of the Christians with them-- among others, David, Earl of Athol, and Adam, Earl of Carrick, and a great many other Scottish and English nobles. Now Adam, Earl of Carrick, left an only daughter, named Martha, as his heiress; and she succeeded him in his domain and earldom. After she had, therefore, become mistress of her father's domain, as she was, one day, going out hunting at random, with her esquires and handmaidens, she met a gallant knight riding across the same country-- a most seemly youth, named
Robert of Bruce, son of Robert, surnamed the Bruce, the noble lord of Annandale in Scotland, and of Cleveland in England. When greetings and kisses had been given on
 


THE SECOND AND THIRD ALEXANDERS TO JOHN BALIOL


each side, as is the wont of courtiers, she besought him to stay and hunt, and walk about; and seeing that he was rather unwilling to do so, she by force, so to speak, with her own hand, made him pull up, and brought the knight, although very loath, to her castle of Turnberry with her. After dallying there, with his followers, for the space of fifteen days or more, he clandes-tinely took the countess to wife; while the friends and well-wishers of both knew nothing about it, nor had the king's consent been got at all in the matter. Therefore the common belief of the whole country was that she had seized--by force, as it were--this youth for her husband. But when this came to King Alexander's ears, he took the castle of Turnberry, and made all her other lands and possessions be acknowledged as in his hands, because she had wedded with Robert of Bruce without having consulted his royal majesty. By means of the prayers of friends, however, and by a certain sum of money agreed upon, this Robert gained the king's goodwill, and the whole domain. Of Martha, by God's providence, he begat a son, who was to be the savior, champion, and king of the bruised Scottish people, as the course of the history will show forth; and his father's name, Robert, was given him.

This death, terminating the direct line of Alexander III., left the succession open to numerous collateral claimants, chief of whom were John de Baliol, claiming by right of his descent from Margaret, the oldest daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, through her daughter, Dervergoyll (Baliol's mother); and Robert Brus (II.), son of David's second daughter, Isabella. Bruce's claim was based upon the fact of his being the nearest male descendant of David, as opposed to that of Baliol, who was one generation farther removed from David, although himself the descendant of David's eldest daughter. Besides these two there were eight other competitors for the crown, their titles all being more remote than those of Baliol and Bruce. 

The Scots desired a delay to consider whether or not they should accept Edward as their monarch. After three weeks had elapsed the second meeting was held, this time on the north bank of the Tweed, at which were present seven of the claimants to the throne:
Robert Bruce; Florence, Count of Holland; John de Hastings, Lord of Abergavenny; Patrick de Dunbar, Earl of March; William de Ross; Robert de Pinkeny; and Nicholas de Soulis.Bruce and his party, forty by Baliol and his party, and twenty-four by the king of England. Upon their appointment the cause was submitted, and about a year later their findings were made known to the Lord Paramount. 

Toward the end of the year 1292, the finding of the commissioners on the vital point in question between
Bruce and Baliol was announced. It was to the effect that, "by the laws and usages of both kingdoms, in every heritable succession, the more remote in one degree lineally descended from the eldest sister, was preferable to the nearer in degree issuing from the second sister." 

As Baliol was the grandson of the eldest sister, and
Bruce the son of the second sister of the daughters of Earl David, this answer was favorable to the former, and in November, 1292, Edward rendered judgment accordingly. John Baliol was therefore crowned at Scone on the 30th day of the same month, becoming king of Scotland by grace of his Lord Paramount, Edward I.; and doing homage to that ruler for his kingdom before the end of the year.
 


WALLACE AND BRUCE


joined the standard of revolt, among them being Robert Wisheart, Bishop of Glasgow; Alexander de Lindesay, the Steward of Scotland and his brother, Sir Richard Lundin, and Robert de Brus (Bruce). The patriots soon had a considerable army gathered, which was posted in the vicinity of Irvine in Ayrshire. Here, Henry de Percy, having marched to the scene of the uprising with a considerable force, found them. 

During the progress of these operations Edward had been absent in Flanders. Upon his return in the early part of the year 1298, having first vainly summoned the Scottish barons to meet him in a Parliament at York, he assembled an army and marched toward the Border.7 At this time, as we have seen, Wallace had the active support of but a few of the Scottish noblemen, the great majority being deterred from taking up arms through fear of Edward or by reason of their jealousy of Wallace. Among his followers, however, were John Comyn of Badenoch, Sir John Stewart of Bon-kill, brother to the Steward, Sir John Graham of Abercorn, Macduff, the granduncle of the Earl of Fife, and young
Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick. The leader last named guarded the castle of Ayr. 

Edward now marched into the West, stopping first to repair Stirling Castle which had been burned by the Scots, and then proceeding into Annan-dale. At his approach, it is said, Bruce burned the castle of Ayr and retired.10 Edward thereupon seized
Bruce's castle of Lochmaben in Dumfries, wherein were confined the hostages given in 1297 as pledges for the loyalty of Galloway. 

After the disastrous defeat at Falkirk, Wallace resigned his office as governor of Scotland, and in the summer of 1299, William Lamberton, Bishop of St. Andrews,
Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick, and John Comyn of Badenoch, the younger, were chosen guardians of the kingdom in his place. Soon afterwards they besieged and took Stirling Castle. From this time on the name of Wallace as a national leader disappears from the records of the councils and conflicts of Scotland. 

The period of Wallace and
Bruce also marks the close in Scotland of the Feudal Era, which had been inaugurated by David and his successors somewhat more than a century before. The plan of campaigning necessarily carried on by the Scots in their contests with the vastly superior forces of Edward's armored knights was probably the inception in Great Britain of our modern system of warfare, wherein more attention is paid to ensuring the intelligence and efficiency of the individual soldier in the ranks, together with his proper arming, than to the construction of massive fortifications or the glorification of knightly valor.
 
To this end,
Bruce set a notable example by appearing at the battle of Bannockburn practically without armor, and inaugurating that contest by crushing, with a single blow of his axe, the heavily armored English knight who rode out from the ranks to oppose him. And on the death of King Robert, after Scotland had finally established her independence, he is said to have left a memorable legacy to his fellow-countrymen; one which has never been made use of by them but with advantage. This was in the shape of a code of rules or instructions for the defence of their mountainous kingdom from the invasions of the English; and it has come down to us in the following modified form, styled "Good King Robert's Testament": 
 
historians belong to the fourteenth century. As the period now under consideration is one of extreme interest, it merits a more detailed examination than can be given in a sketch like the present. The latest and best account of
historians belong to the fourteenth century. As the period now under consideration is one of extreme interest, it merits a more detailed examination than can be given in a sketch like the present. The latest and best account of Bruce and of the Scottish War of Independence is that of Herbert Maxwell (New York and London, 1897). For our purpose, however, we may view Bruce's career and the events succeeding from the standpoint of Fordun's Annals. Before doing this it may be well to examine briefly the sources from which his history is drawn, and also to glance at some of the authorities for the preceding and subsequent periods.Bruce, and is considered one of the most valuable records of border history (Bannatyne Club, 1839).
 
Those who submitted at Irvine were
Robert Bruce, The Steward and his brother, Alex- 

"The tale of Comyn's treachery, and Wallace's ill-timed resentment, may have gained credit, because it is a pretty tale, and not improbable in itself. But it amazes me that the story of the congress of Bruce and Wallace, after the battle of Falkirk, should have gained credit. I lay aside the full evidence which we now possess, 'that
Bruce was not, at that time, of the English party, nor present at the battle.' For it must be admitted that our historians knew nothing of those circumstances which demonstrate the impossibility of the congress. But the wonder is, that men of sound judgment should not have seen the absurdity of a long conversation between the commander of a flying army and one of the leaders of a victorious army. When Fordun told the story, he placed 'a narrow but inaccessible glen' between the speakers. Later historians have substituted the river Garron in the place of the inaccessible glen, and they make Bruce and Wallace talk across the river like two young declaimers from the pulpits in a school of rhetoric."--Hailes, Annals of Scotland, vol. i., pp. 286-288. 
 
For some time after that the Earl of Carrick acted a very dubious part. Heming-burgh says that "when he heard of the king's coming [westward, after Falkirk], he fled from his face and burnt the castle of Ayr which he held." But the testimony of both English and Scottish chroniclers is of little value, for it was the object of both, with different motives, to make it appear that
Bruce attached himself early to the national cause. There is extant a letter written by Bruce from Turnberry Castle on July 3d, apparently in this year, to Sir John de Langton, Chancellor of England, begging a renewal of the protection to three knights who were with him on the king's service in Galloway. Again, in another document, undated, but apparently written in the late autumn of 1298, Bruce is commanded by King Edward to bring 1000 picked men of Galloway and Carrick to join an expedition about to be made into Scotland. However, as there is some doubt about the date of these papers, Bruce's attitude during 1298 must be held to be uncertain. It is to be noted, however, that when Edward, on returning to England after his victory at Falkirk, made grants of land in Scotland to his followers, Annandale and Carrick, held by the elder and younger Bruce, were not among the lands so disposed of. Nevertheless, the Bruces do not seem to have been in possession of Annandale at this time, for in 1299 Sir Alan FitzWarin defended Loch-maben Castle against the Earl of Carrick from 1st to 25th August. This was the immediate outcome of a notable arrangement come to during that summer, whereby the Earl of Carrick (whom, to avoid confusion, I may hereafter designate by his modern title of Bruce), William de Lamberton, Bishop of St. Andrews, and John Comyn of Badenoch (the "Red Comyn") constituted themselves guardians of Scotland in the name of King John (de Balliol). Bruce, as the principal guardian, was to have custody of the castles, but he appears to have been still wavering, for we hear nothing definite of his movements till after the year 1300, when
 


JOHN OF FORDUN'S ANNALS OF WALLACE AND BRUCE  RISE AND FIRST START OF WILLIAM WALLACE



In the year 1298, the aforesaid king of England, taking it ill that he and his should be put to so much loss and driven to such straits by William Wallace, gathered together a large army, and, having with him, in his company, some of the nobles of Scotland to help him, invaded Scotland. He was met by the aforesaid William, with the rest of the magnates of that kingdom; and a desperate battle was fought near Falkirk, on the 22nd of July. William was put to flight, not without serious loss both to the lords and to the common people of the Scottish nation. For, on account of the ill-will, begotten of the spring of envy, which the Comyns had conceived towards the said William, they, with their accomplices, forsook the field, and escaped unhurt. On learning their spiteful deed, the aforesaid William, wishing to save himself and his, hastened to flee by another road. But alas! through the pride and burning envy of both, the noble Estates [communitas] of Scotland lay wretchedly overthrown throughout hill and dale, mountain and plain. Among these, of the nobles, John Stewart, with his Brendans; Macduff, of Fife; and the inhabitants thereof, were utterly cut off. But it is commonly said that Robert of Bruce,--who was afterwards king of Scotland, but then fought on the side of the king of England--was the means of bringing about this victory. For, while the Scots stood invincible in their ranks, and could not be broken by either force or stratagem, this Robert of Bruce went with one line, under Anthony of Bek, by a long road round a hill, and attacked the Scots in the rear; and thus these, who had stood invincible and impenetrable in front, were craftily overcome in the rear. And it is remarkable that we seldom, if ever, read of the Scots being overcome by the English, unless through the envy of lords, or the treachery and deceit of the natives, taking them over to the other side. 

After the withdrawal of the king of England, the English nation lorded it in all parts of the kingdom of Scotland, ruthlessly bartying the Scots in sundry and manifold ways, by insults, stripes, and slaughter, under the awful yoke of slavery. But God, in His mercy, as is the wont of His fatherly goodness, had compassion on the woes, the ceaseless crying and sorrow, of the Scots; so He raised up a savior and champion unto them--one of their own fellows, to-wit., named
Robert of Bruce. This man, seeing them stretched in the slough of woe, and reft of all hope of salvation and help, was inwardly touched with sorrow of heart; and, putting forth his hand unto force, underwent the countless and unbearable toils of the heat of day, of cold and hunger, by land and sea, gladly welcoming weariness, fasting, dangers, and the snares not only of foes, but also of false friends, for the sake of freeing his brethren.
 
Now, when a few days had rolled on, after the said John's death, this
Robert of Bruce, taking with him as many men as he could get, hastened to Scone; and, being set on the royal throne, was there crowned, on the 27th of March, 1306, in the manner wherein the kings of Scotland were wont to be invested;--and great was the task he then undertook, and unbearable were the burdens he took upon his shoulders. For, not only did he lift his hand against the king of England, and all partakers with him, but he also launched out into a struggle with all and sundry of the kingdom of Scotland, except a very few well-wishers of his, who, if one looked at the hosts of those pitted against them, were as one drop of water compared with the waves of the sea, or a single grain of any seed with the multitudinous sand. His mishaps, flights, and dangers; hardships and weariness; hunger and thirst; watchings and fastings; nakedness and cold; snares and banishment; the seizing, imprisoning, slaughter, and downfall of his near ones, and--even more--dear ones (for all this had he to undergo, when overcome and routed in the beginning of his war)--no one, now living, I think, recollects, or is equal to rehearsing, all this. Indeed, he is reported to have said to his knights, one day, when worn out by such numberless and ceaseless hardships and dangers:-- 

The same year, while this king was fleeing from his foes, and lurking with his men, in the borders of Athol and Argyle, he was again beaten and put to flight, on the 11th of August, at a place called Dalry. But there, also, he did not lose many of his men. Nevertheless, they were all filled with fear, and were dispersed and scattered throughout various places. But the queen fled to Saint Duthac in Ross, where she was taken by William, Earl of Ross, and brought to the king of England; and she was kept a prisoner in close custody, until the battle of Bannockburn. Nigel of
Bruce, however, one of the king's brothers, fled, with many ladies and damsels, to Kyndrumie [Kildrummie] Castle, and was there welcomed, with his companions. But, the same year, that castle was made over to the English through treachery, and Nigel, and other nobles of both sexes, were taken prisoners, brought to Berwick, and suffered capital punishment. The same year, Thomas and Alexander of Bruce, brothers of the aforesaid king, while hastening towards Carrick by another road, were taken at Loch Ryan, and beheaded at Carlisle --and, thus, all who had gone away and left the king, were, in that same year, either bereft of life, or taken and thrown into prison. Edward of Bruce, who overcame the said Donald and all the Galwegians. In this struggle, Edward slew a certain knight named Roland, with many of the nobles of Galloway; and arrested their
 
Edward of Bruce, King Robert's brother, entered Ireland, with a mighty hand, in the year 1315; and having been set up as king there, he destroyed the whole of Ulster, and committed countless murders. This, however, some little time after, brought him no good. In the year 1316, King Robert went to Ireland, to the Southern parts thereof, to afford his brother succor and help. But, in this march, many died of hunger, and the rest lived on horse-flesh. The king, however, at once returned, and left his brother there. In the year1317, the cardinals were plundered, in England, by Robert of Middleton, who was, soon after, taken, and drawn by liorses, in London. 

In the year 1318, Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray, destroyed the northern parts of England; and, on the 28th of March of the same year, the Scots took the town of Betwick, which had been, for twenty years, in the hands of the English. On the 14th of October of the same year was fought the battle of Dundalk, in Ireland, in which fell the
Lord Edward of Bruce, and a good many Scottish nobles with him. The cause of this war was this: Edward was a very mettlesome and high-spirited man, and would not dwell together with his brother in peace, unless he had half the kingdom to himself; and for this reason was stirred up in Ireland, this war, wherein, as already stated, he ended his life. 

On the 7th of June, 1329, died
Robert of Bruce, of goodly memory, the illustrious King of Scots, at Cardross, in the twenty-fourth year of his reign. He was, beyond all living men of his day, a valiant knight.
 
"Posterity ought to remember the chief associates of
Bruce in his arduous attempt to restore the liberties of Scotland. 

"They were, William of Lambyrton, Bishop of St Andrew's; Robert Wisheart, Bishop of Glasgow; the Abbot of Scone; the four brothers of
Bruce, Edward, Nigel, Thomas, and Alexander; his nephew, Thomas Randolph of Strathdon; his brother-in-law, Christopher Seaton of Seaton; Malcolm (5th) Earl of Lennox; John of Strathbogie (l0th) Earl of Athole; Sir James Douglas; Gilbert de la Haye of Errol, and his brother Hugh de la Haye; David Barclay of Cairns of Fife; Alexander Fraser, brother of Simon Fraser of Oliver Castle; Walter de Somerville of Linton and Carnwath; David of Inchmartin; Robert Boyd; and Robert Fleming; Randolph, afterwards Earl of Moray; Seaton, ancestor of the Duke of Gordon, Earl of Winton, Earl of Dunfermline, and Viscount Kingston; De la Haye, of Earl of Errol; Fraser of Lord Lovat and Lord Salton; Somerville, of Lord Somerville; Inchmartin, of Earl of Findlater, Earl of Airley, and Lord Banff; Boyd, of Earl of Kilmarnock; Fleming of Earl of Wigton. Matth. Westm., p. 452, adds Alan Earl of Mentieth. Nigel Campbell, the predecessor of the Duke of Argyle, etc., and Fraser of Oliver Castle, were also engaged in the cause; but it does not appear that they assisted at the coronation of Robert I.--To this list David Moray, Bishop of Moray, might be added. The English asserted that he preached to the people of his diocese, ' that it was no less meritorious to rise in arms for supporting the cause of Bruce, than to engage in a crusade against the Saracens.' "--Hailes, Annals of Scotland, vol ii., pp. 2, 3. 

requested an interview with him in the convent of the Minorites. There they met before the great altar.
Bruce passionately reproached Comyn for his treachery. 'You lie,' cried Comyn. Bruce stabbed him instantly. Hastening out of the sanctuary, he called 'To horse.' His attendants, Lindesay and Kirkpatrick, perceiving him pale, and in extreme agitation, anxiously enquired, how it was with him? 'Ill,' replied Bruce, 'I doubt I have slain Comyn.' 'You doubt?' cried Kirkpatrick; and rushing into the church, fixed his dagger in Comyn's heart (l0th February 1306). "Sir Robert Comyn generously attempted to defend his kinsman, and shared his fate. "The justiciaries were holding their court at Dumfries when this strange event happened. Imagining their lives to be sought, they barricaded the doors. Bruce ordered the house to be fired. They surrendered. He permitted them to depart out of Scotland unmolested.Bruce assembled his army at Torwood, between Folkirk and Stirling; and he chose the ground on which he was to combat the English.  

"June 23. Edward II., with his army, came in sight of the Scots, who were posted between Stirling and the stream called Bannockburn. There were skirmishes, this day, in which the Scots had the advantage.
Bruce slew Henry de Bohun in single combat. 

"
Edward Bruce, and Douglas, wasted Northumberland, laid the bishopric of Durham under contribution, penetrated to Richmond in Yorkshire, burnt Appleby, etc., and returned home loaded with plunder. 

"September 18.
Bruce having made overtures for peace, Edward II. appointed commissioners to treat with the Scots.
 


 FROM
FROM BRUCE TO FLODDEN



KING ROBERT BRUCE was succeeded by his son David, then a boy seven years of age, who was crowned at Scone November 24, 1331. Randolph, Earl of Moray, became regent, in accordance with King Robert's settlement. He died, however, in July, 1332, and was followed in the regency by the Earl of Mar, a man of vastly inferior ability.
 


THE BEGINNING OF THE REFORMATION


noteworthy fact in connection with the history of the Reformation in Scotland that most of its leaders and armies came from the western Lowlands, chiefly from those districts in which Wallace and Bruce had lived and raised their armies more than two centuries before. Especially interesting is this fact to him who studies the history of the transplanted Scot in Ireland and America; for most of the Scottish emigrants to those countfides emigrated from that part of Scotland.
 


JAMES STUART, SON OF MARY



the Princess Anne of Denmark. Before starting he appointed Robert Bruce, one of the ministers of Edinburgh, as a member of his Privy Council, declaring that he trusted to him more than to all his nobles to preserve peace in the country.
 


 

Kennedy

 


WHO ARE THE SCOTCH-IRISH?


 
Smith, Moore, Boyd, Johnson, M'Millan, Brown, Bell, Campbell, M'Neill, Crawford, M'Alister, Hunter, Macaulay, Robinson, Wallace, Millar,
Kennedy, and Hill. The list has a very Scottish flavor altogether, although it may be noted that the names that are highest on the list are those which are common to both England and Scotland: for it may be taken for granted that the English "Thompson" has swallowed up the Scottish "Thomson," that "Moore" includes the Ayrshire "Muir," and that the Annandale "Johnstones" have been merged by the writer in the English "Johnsons." One other point is very striking--that the great Ulster name of O'Neill is wanting, and also the Antrim "Macdonnel." . . . Another strong proof of the Scottish blood of the Ulstermen may be found by taking the annual reports presented to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland, held in June, 1887. Here are the names of the men, lay and clerical, who sign these reports, the names being taken as they occur: J. W. Whigham, Jackson Smith, Hamilton Magee, Thomas Armstrong, William Park, J. M. Rodgers, David Wilson, George Macfarland, Thomas Lyle, W. Rogers, J. B. Wylie, W. Young, E. F. Simpson, Alexander Turnbull, John Malcolm, John H. Orr. Probably the reports of our three Scottish churches taken together could not produce so large an average of Scottish surnames.-- The Scot in Ulster, Edinburgh, 1888, pp. 103-105.
 


THE NORSE AND GALLOWAY



If any part of the Pictish people might be expected to retain their peculiar language and characteristics, it would be the Picts of Galloway; and if that language had been a Cymric dialect, it must have merged in the speech of the British population around them. In one of the legends which seems peculiarly connected with them, Gaedel Ficht or the Gaelic Pict appears as the "eponymus" of the race; and Buchanan tells us that in his day, that is, in the reign of Queen Mary, "a great part of this country still uses its ancient language." What that language was we learn from a contemporary of Buchanan, William Dunbar, the poet, who, in the "Flyting" between him and Kennedy, taunted his rival with his extraction from the natives of Galloway and Carrick, and styles him" Ersch Katheraine," "Ersch brybour baird," and his poetry as "sic eloquence as they in Erschert use." This word "Ersch" was the term applied at the time to Scotch Gaelic, as when Sir David Lyndesay says--
 
 


FROM BRUCE TO FLODDEN



He was succeeded by his son, James III., also a boy of eight years at the time of his father's death. For several years the government was conducted by Bishop Kennedy, who died in 1466. Lord Boyd then seized the king's person, and assumed supreme control of the kingdom. In 1467, his eldest son was created Earl of Arran and married to the king's sister. But the rule of the Boyds was of short duration. In 1469 they were tried for treason and convicted. The head of the house fled to England, where he soon afterwards died. His brother Alexander was executed at Edinburgh. The Earl of Arran was forced to flee, and was soon stripped of his royal wife by a divorce. She afterwards married the head of the Hamilton family, and that house subsequently attained a high position in the kingdom.
 


THE SCOTTISH PLANTATION OF DOWN AND ANTRIM


Edmond Kelly, James Kelly, William Kelton, David Kennedy, George Kennedy, Doctor Hugh Kennedy, James Kennedy, John Kennedy, Andrew Kernochan, Robert Kindsay, Widow Laggan, Widow Laughlin, Widow Lead, Archibald Lenox, Widow Lenox, James Lenzy, John Leslie's executor, Samuel Lewes, James Lindsay, John Lindsay, Elizabeth Lockert, John Lockert, Richard Lockart, Robert Loggan, John Long, Robert Long, Widow Lowdan, James Lowdon, John Lowdon, John Lowdon, Jr., Thomas Lowry, John Luke, James Luthersdale, Janet Lyon, Alexander McAmt, John McBride, Andrew McCaldon, Andrew McCalla, Joseph McCan, John McCardy, James McCarly, Thomas McCarly, Widow McCarly, Alexander McCartney, William McClurgh, W. James McCo, Janet McComb, Caghtry McConnell, James McConnell, John McConnell, William McCormick, Adam McCrea, Matthew McCrea, Robert McCreery, Robert McCrery, James McCullam's widow, Thomas McCullen, Widow McCullin, James McDowell, John McDowell, Patrick McDowell, Widow McDowell, John McDoran, Andrew McFerran, Thomas McFerran, Archibald McGibbon, John McGill, Revd. Jackson McGuire, Widow McIlduffe, Thomas McIlrath, John McHoll, Alexander McKee, John McKee, Thomas McKee, Ninian McKelvy, Thomas McKelvy, Widow McKelvy, Joseph McKitrick, John McLaughlin, Alice Mc-Mehan, James McMechan, John McMechan, Patrick McMechan,Widow Mc-Mechan, William McMechan, William McMorlan, Eneas McMullen, Hugh McMullan, James McMunce, James McMurray, James McNaght, John McNarry, John McNeily, James McNily, Alexander McRobins, Alexander McTeer, James McWilliam, James Macumson, John Mahaule, George Mally, John Malley, -- Mant, John Matthew Marshall, Matthew Marshall, Finlay Martin, Joseph Martin, William Martin, John Mathy, Alexander Maxwell, George Maxwell, James Maxwell, Robert Maxwell, Philip Mayers, Josias Milton, James Mitchell, Robert Mitchell, David Montgomery, Hugh Montgomery, Nathaniel Montgomery, William Montgomery, Widow Montgomery, John Moorhead, William Moorhead, Widow Moorhead, Arcibald Moore, Captain Moore, Hugh Moore, James Moore, Jane Moore, John Moore, Robert Moore, Widow Moore, James Morell, Captain Morrow, David Morrow, Samuel Mossman, Widow Murray, Mrs. Neill, Widow Nelson, John Nesbit, Thomas Nesbitt, George Newell, Hugh Nicholson, James Oghterson, Thomas Oliver, Patrick Orr, Tomas Orr, Janet Paradine, Alexander Parker, Gawin Patterson, John Patterson, Robert Patterson, William Patterson, James Peticrue, John Petticrew, William Petticrew, Widow Petticrew, John Patton, George Pollock, Thomas Pottinger, Randulph Price, Esq., Widow Purdy, ---- Ramsey's heirs, Hugh Rea, James Rea, Widow Rea, Alexander Read, John Read, Mrs. Richison, Mrs. Ritchison, Alexander Ritchy, Archibald Richy, Widow Ritchy, George Ringland, Alexander Robb, John Robb, John Robinson, George Ross, James Ross, Esq., John Ross, Robert Ross, William Rowan, Gawen Russell, William Russell, Hugh Savage, James Savage, Esq., John Savage, Esq., John Scott, Margaret Scott, Widow Scott, John Shannon, John Shaw, William Shaw, Esq., Widow Shearer, James Sim, Gilbert Simpson, Robert Simpson, Widow Simpson, Mr. Sloan,---Sloane, James Sloan, James Sloans, James Smith, John Smith, Robert Smith, Alexander Spittle, James Spotswood, James Stanus, James Steele, James Steel, Jr., Robert Sterlin, Hans Stevenson, James Stevenson, John 

Gilbert Adare of Ardehine, Andrew Agnewe of Carnie, Thomas Agnew, Gray Abbey, John Aickin of Donoghdie, Patrick Allen of Ballydonane, David Anderson of Castle Canvarie, John Barkley of Ballyrolly, David Boyde of Glasroche, Thomas Boyde of Crownerston, Robert Boyle of Drumfad, Nynnan Bracklie Newton of Donoghdie, William Caderwood of Ballyfrenzeis, James Cathcart of Ballirogane, James Cowper of Ballichosta, Michael Craig of the Redene, William Crawford of Cuningburn, Claud Conyngham of Donoghdie, David Cunyngham of Drumfad, Hugh Cunyng-ham of Castlespick, John Cuningham of Rinchrivie, William Cuninghame of Donoghdie, Charles Domelston of Proveston, John Fraser of Donoghdie, John Harper of Ballyhay, John Harper of Donoghdie, Robert Harper of Provostoun, Thomas Harvie of Newton, Thomas Kelso of Ballyhacamore, David Kennedy of Gortivillan, Walter Logane of Logane, Uthred McDow-gall of Ballimaconnell, David McIlveyne of Ballelogan, James McMakene of Donoghdie, John Martin of Dunnevilly, James Maxwell of Gransho, John Maxwell of Ballihalbert, Hugh Montgomery of Granshaghe, John Montgomery of Ballymacrosse, John Montgomery of the Redene, Matthew Montgomery of Donoghdie, Patrick Montgomerie of Ballycreboy, Robert Montgomery of Donoghdie, William Montgomery of Donoghdie, Hector
 
was further required carefully to enroll the men and arms in a book, to be consulted when troops might be needed for active service. From this statement of the author it is evident that a large number of settlers had come with
Sir Hugh Montgomery to the Ards during the first four years of his colonization. It is to be regretted that no list of these original settlers can now be found. Among them were several named Orr, who appear to have originally settled in the townlands of BalIyblack and Ballykeel, and were the progenitors of a very numerous connection of this surname throughout the Ards. The earliest recorded deaths in this connection, after their settlement in the Ards, were those of James Orr of Ballyblack, who died in the year 1627, and Janet McClement, his wife, who died in 1636. The descendants, male and female, of this worthy couple were very numerous, and as their intermarriages have been carefully recorded, we have thus fortunately a sort of index to the names of many other families of Scottish settlers in the Ards and Castlereagh. Their descendants in the male line intermarried with the families of Dunlop, Gray, Kennedy, Coulter, Todd, M'Birney, M'Cullough, Campbell, Boyd, Jackson, Walker, Rodgers, Stevenson, Malcomson, King, Ferguson, M'Quoid, Cregg, Bart, M'Munn, Bryson, Johnson, Smith, Carson, M'Kinstry, Busby, M'Kce, Shannon, M'Garock, Hamilton, Cally, Chalmers, Red, M'Roberts, Creighton, M'Whirter, M'Kibben, Cleland, Abernethy, Reid, Agnew, Wilson, Irvine, Lindsay, M'Creary, Porter, Hanna, Taylor, Smyth, Carson, Wallace, Gamble, Miller, Catherwood, Malcolm, M'Cleary, Pollok, Lamont, Frame, Stewart, Minnis, Moorehead, M'Caw, Clark, Patterson, Neilson, Maxwell, Harris, Corbet, Milling, Carr, Winter, Patty, Cumming, M'Connell, M'Gowan. Nearly an equal number of Orrs married wives of their own surname. These numerous descendants, bearing the surname of Orr, resided in Ballyblack, Clontinacally, Killinether, Ballygowan, Ballykeel, MunIough, Bally-been, Castleaverie, Conlig, Lisleen, Bangor, Gortgrib, Granshaw, Killaghey, Gilna-hirk, Ballyalloly, Ballyknockan, Ballycloughan, Tullyhubbert, Moneyrea, Newtownards, Ballymisca, Dundonald, Magherascouse, Castlereagh, Bootin, Lisdoonan, Greyabbey, Ballyrea, Ballyhay, Ballywilliam, Saintfield, Ballymacarrett, Craigantlet, Braniel. The greatest number of the name lived in Ballykeel, Clontinacally, and Ballygowan. The descendants in the female line from James Orr and Janet M'Clement of Ballyblack inter-married with the families of Riddle of Comber, Thomson of Newtownards, Moore of Drum-mon, Orr of Lisleen, Orr of Ballykeel, Murdock of Comber, Irvine of Crossnacreevy, M'Creary of Bangor, Hanna of Conlig, Orr of Bangor, Orr of Ballygowan, M'Munn of Lis-leen, Barr of Lisleen, Davidson of Clontinacally, Jamieson of Killaghey, Martin of Killy-nure, Martin of Gilnahirk, Matthews of ---, Watson of Carryduff, Shaw of Clontinacally, Todd of Ballykeel, Jennings of ---, Davidson of ---, M'Kibbin of Knocknasham, M'Cormick of Ballybeen, M'Cullock of Ballyhanwood, M'Kee of Lisleen, Patterson of Moneyrea, Dunwoody of Madyroe, Barr uf Bangor, M'Gee of Todstown, Burgess of Mady-roe, M'Kinning of Lisnasharock, Gerrit of Ballyknockan, Pettigrew of Ballyknockan, M'Coughry of Ballyknockan, Yates of ---, Shaw of ---, Stevenson of Ballyrush, .M'Kib-bin of Haw, Piper of Comber, Blakely of Madyroe, Orr of Ballyknockan, Stewart of Clon-tinacally, Hamilton of Ballykeel, Dunbar of Slatady, Orr of Ballygowan, Malcolm of Bootan, Porter of Ballyristle, M'Connell of Ballyhenry, Kennedy of Comber, Malcolm of Moat, Orr of Ballykeel, Martin of Ballycloughan, Reid of Ballygowan, Lewis of ---, Orr of Clontinacally, Orr of Florida, M'Creary of ---, Miller of Conlig, Lowry of Bally-macashan, Harris of Ballymelady, Orr of BaIlyknockan, M'Quoid of Donaghadee, Appleton of Conlig, M'Burney of ---, Hanna of Clontinacally, Johnson of Rathfriland, Orr of Bally-keel, Stewart of Clontinacally and Malone, Patterson of Moneyrea and Lisbane, Black of Gortgrib, Hill of Gilnahirk, Murdock of Gortgrif, Kilpatrick of ---., Gregg of ---, Huddlestone of Moneyrea, M'Culloch of Moneyrea, Steel of Maghrescouse, Erskine of Woodlburn, Campbell of ---, White of ---, Clark of Clontinacally, M'Fadden of Clon-tinacally, Hunter of Clontinacally and Ravarra, Orr of Castlereagh, M'Kean of ---, M'Kittrick of Lisleen, Frame of Munlough, Garret of Ballyknockan, Kennedy of Tullygir- 
van, Orr of Munlough, Dickson of Tullygirvan, M'Clure of Clontinacally, Porter of Beech-hill, Dinwoody of Carrickmadyroe, Strain of Newtownards, Burns of Cahard, Kennedy of Tullygirvan. M'Calla of Lisdoonan, M'Bratney of Raferey, Harrison of HoIywood, Piper of Moneyrea, MacWilliam of Ednaslate, Patterson of Tonachmore, Wright of Craigantlet, Boden of Craigantlet, Henderson of Ballyhaskin, Morrow of Belfast, M'Quoid of BranieI, M'Lean of Ballykeel, Neilson of Ravara, Crawford of Carrickmadyroe, M'Gown of Cross-nacreevy, Orr of Ballybee (MSS. Genealogy of the Family of James Orr of Ballyblack, drawn up from inscriptions on tombstones, by the late Gawin Orr of Castlereagh).--Rev.
 


THE ULSTER PLANTATION FROM 1610 TO 1630



500 acres, John Hamilton (grantee of Claude Hamilton, who had been obliged to give up 500 acres of his original proportion to the Dean of Armagh): stone bawn and six houses near; 1 freeholder, 4 lessees, 5 cottagers; able to produce 22 men with arms. [500 acres, John Hamilton (grantee of Claude Hamilton, who had been obliged to give up 500 acres of his original proportion to the Dean of Armagh): stone bawn and six houses near; 1 freeholder, 4 lessees, 5 cottagers; able to produce 22 men with arms. [John Hamilton's tenants in 1617] William Hope, John Grane, Edward Irwinge, Matthew Gamble, Cornelius McKernan, Andrew Bell, David Arkles, John Hamilton, John Davidson, Alexander Sym, Patrick Ritchie, Fergus Fleck, Eliza Grier, John Hamilton the elder, Cuthbert Grier, Robert Gilmore, Adam Rae, David Leetch, Robert Hamilton, Archibald Grame, John Willie, William Bell, Robert Hamilton, Henry Grindall, John Hamilton the elder of Dromanish, and his son John, Adam Colte, John Johnstone, Patrick Graunton, George Parker, Henry Hunter, John Deans, John Trumble, John Kirk, Francis Carruthers, James Moffat, Raulfe Grindell, Thomas Courtiouse, Henry Grindell, Gilbert Kennedy, Laurence Shirloe, Robert Ferguson, John Browne, John Ferguson, Thomas Pringle, Archbauld Grier, John Hall, George Gamble, Owen O'Corr, Cormack O'Corr, Robert Elliott, Alexander Grier, Robert Allen, John Allen, and Bryanbane O'Neale.]Gilbert Kennedy and John Collis. Christopher Harrison was the first purchaser from the landlord.]
1000 acres,
David Kennedy: stone bawn containing timber house; 2 freeholders, 5 lessees, 9 cottagers, 12 houses; able to produce 36 men with arms. [Sold to John Syminton before 1630.]
1000 acres,
James Cunningham: stone house and bawn; 2 freeholders, 6 lessees, 15 cottagers; able to produce 42 men with arms. [On the 1st of May, 1613, James Coningham, or Cunningham, set out a large quantity of his lands to the persons whose names are underwritten: Alexander Dunne, John Dunne, Donnell McKym, John Dunne, junior, John Younge, William Hendry, Alexander Grynney William Stewart, William Valentyne, Hugh Moore, William Moore, David Kennedy, John Watson, Robert Paterson, William Ekyn, George Blacke, Andrew Smythe, James Gilmore, William Gaate [Galt], George Peere [Pery], John McKym, Andrew Browne, William Sutherland, William Rankin, John Smythe, John Purveyance, John Harper, Hugh Lokard, Thomas Scott, John Browne, John Roger, William Teyse, [Teese], Donnell McEredy, David Kennedy, William Valentyne, William Arnett, Andrew Arnett, John Alexander, John Hutchine, Peter Stevenson, John Hamilton, Edward Homes, George Leich. (Inquisitions of Ulster, Donegal, 5, Car. I.).]
 


CHURCH RULE IN IRELAND AND ITS RESULTS


 
ordained minister of Cairncastle, near Larne, and for a lengthened period occupied a distinguished position among his brethren in the Church. Mr. Thomas Kennedy was in the same-year ordained at Donaghmore, two miles from Dungannon. Mr. Kennedy was elder brother of Mr. Gilbert Kennedy of Dundonald, and nephew of John, sixth earl of Cassilis, one of the lay-assessors of the Westminster Assembly. About the same time Mr. Anthony Shaw was settled in Belfast, Mr. Thomas Hall in Larne, and Mr. Robert Cunningham in Broadisland. The work of supplying vacant congregations went on with rapidity. Presbyterians in great numbers now came from Scotland, and Ulster seemed about to enter on a new career of prosperity.
 


LONDONDERRY AND ENNISKILLEN



Captain George Welsh, Mr. William Shaw, Captain Ferguson, Lieutenant Huston, Lieutenant Robert Ferguson, Alexander Pringle, Andrew Taggatt, Quintin Kennedy, James Cutberd [Cuthbert?], John Wilson, Teague O'Munts, William Crawford, William Sloane, Mr. Arthur Upton, John Crawford, Mr. Francis Shaw, Gilbert MacNeilly, Lieutenant Samuel Wallace, George Young, John Wilson. 

David Kennedy, Lieutenant Campbell, Captain Henry Langford, William Norris, William Cunningham, George Campbell, John Gordon of Borsheagh, Lieutenant Erwin, Lieutenant Antony Ellis, Lieutenant MacElroy. 

Major John Stewart, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Kennedy, Captain James Stewart, Captain Alexander Stewart, Fergus MacDougall, John MacDougall, John Boyle, John Getty, Alexander Stewart, sen., James Maxwell, Captain Marmaduke Shaw, John Henry, Cornet Robert Knox, Mr. William Hutchin, Robert Henry, Alexander Scott, Lieutenant James Moncrief, Robert Harrute, Andrew Rowan, Thomas Boyd, Samuel Dunbarr, Alexander Delap, Adam Delap, Anthony Kennedy, Major Hugh Montgomery, Cornet John Gordon, Captain John Huston, Lieutenant-Colonel Cunningham, John Bell, Mr. Adam Boyd, John Reid, Lieutenant Arch. Campbell, Mr. John Peoples, Mr. Cathcart, Captain Arch. Boyd, Captain John Robinson, Lieutenant Thomas Stewart, Quarter-master Robert Stewart. 

Presbytery of Antrim
--
William Keyes, Belfast; James Shaw, Carnmoney; Robert Cunningham,* Broadisland; Thomas Hall,* Larne; Patrick Adair, Cairncastle; James Fleming, Glenarm; Gilbert Simpson, Ballyclare; Anthony Kennedy,* Templepatrick; Thomas Crawford, Donegore; Robert Hamilton, Killead; Robert Dewart, Connor; John Shaw, Ahog-hill; James Cunningham, Antrim; John Cathcart, Randallstown.

Presbytery of Tyrone--
Robert Auld, Maghera?; Archibald Hamilton, Donaghhendry; George Keith, Dungannon; Thomas Kennedy,* Donoughmore; Thomas Gowan, Glass-lough; John Abernethy,* Minterburn; Alexander Osborn,* Brigh; James Johnston, Lis-naskea?.
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

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