AYRSHIRE ROOTS

Ayrshire Towns and Parishes

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Fairlie

 

 

Fairlie ca 1900

 

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  Fairlie 1846


FAIRLIE, a village, and lately a quoad sacra district, in the parish of Largs, district of Cunninghame, county of Ayr, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Largs; containing 521 inhabitants. This district consists of the southern division, and comprehends about one-third, of the parish of Largs; it is bounded on the west by the Frith of Clyde, and the land rises rather abruptly from the shore, and terminates in two distinct chains of bills on each side of the Kelburn. The loftiest of these hills attains an elevation of nearly 2000 feet, and their substrata are red and white freestone to the height of between 300 and 500 feet, and whinstone on the upper range: at the division of the hills, pudding-stone abounds. Of 5000 acres, not more than 200 or 250 are under tillage, and about the same quantity in natural wood and plantations; the low parterres of Kelburn, the richest in Ayrshire, let at from five to six pounds per acre. The chief owner of the soil is the Earl of Glasgow, whose seat of Kelburn is a beautiful mansion, of which the more substantial part was built in 1556, and the principal modern additions in 1715.


The village of Fairlie is seated on the coast of the Clyde, and on the line of the turnpike-road from Greenock to Ayr; it is a very pleasant little place, much frequented during the summer and autumn by visiters who resort hither from the large and populous towns for the benefit of the sea air and for bathing. The climate is remarkably salubrious; and the retired and picturesque character of the vicinity, ornamented with numerous villas and much beautiful scenery, renders it a popular and very favourite spot, preferred by many strangers to the bustling town of Largs, also a well-frequented watering-place. There is much cod, ling, and haddock fishing, and herrings are occasionally caught: at Kelburn is a salmon-fishery. Steam-boats from Glasgow and Greenock call at the village daily in summer.

The ecclesiastical affairs are under the presbytery of Greenock and synod of Glasgow and Ayr, and the patronage is vested in the Managers and Communicants: the stipend is 75, arising from seat-rents and from ordinary, and two special, collections. The church was built in 18334, at an expense of about 650, and contains 300 sittings. The members of the Free Church have a place of worship. There is an excellent school-house, of which the master has the interest of 300, bequeathed by Lady Jane Boyle, sister of the Earl of Glasgow, and of 100 added by Glasgow gentlemen who have summer residences around Fairlie: the noble proprietor of Kelburn has also given him a house. Attached to the church is a library, and another to the school. Of Fairlie Castle, a strong square building, said to have belonged to Hardicanute, the walls are still entire; and near it, but in West Kilbride parish, are remains of an ancient chapel round which are some fine old trees. Kelburn confers the title of Viscount on the Earl of Glasgow.

From:   A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (1846)

 

 
1837 Pigot's Directory of Fairlie

 

Map of Fairlie today

This Link takes you to the MULTIMAP website where you will find a map of the town and the surrounding area as it is today. You can zoom in and out and move around in all directions.

 

StreetMap of Fairlie

This Link takes you to the STREET website where you will find a street map of the town as it is today. You can zoom in and out and move around in all directions.

 

Map of Old Fairlie

This link goes directly to the OLD MAPS website for a detailed old map of the town around 1860. You can explore out to all sides by using the arrows at the top of the page. These maps are ideal for finding the locations of areas such as farms.

 

1791-99 and 1845 Statistical Accounts

 

Old Maps of Ayrshire Place Names

This link goes directly to the OLD MAPS website for an Ayrshire Index to detailed old maps of most Ayrshire Towns around 1860. You can explore out to all sides by using the arrows at the top of the page. These maps are ideal for finding the locations of areas such as farms.

 

 

Fairlie Web Sites

 

   

Kelburn Castle

Kelburn is thought to be the oldest castle in Scotland to have been continuously inhabited by the same family. Originally the family name was de Boyville but this changed over the years to Boyle . The de Boyvilles from Caen in Normandy came over to Britain with William the Conqueror in 1066 and the present branch of the family settled in Kelburn in 1140.

 
 

 

Fairlie Books

 

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